Macallan Lalique & Bowmore Black Charity Auctions: Own Whisky History!

We’re auctioning the final and oldest releases in two legendary ranges: Bowmore Black 50 Year Old 1964 – The Last Cask and The Macallan in Lalique 65 Year Old – Peerless Spirit with everything over RRP donated to our nominated charity Malaria No More UK.
 
Following the Buffalo Trace Antique Collection auctions (which raised well over £4k for an excellent cause) and another update to our auction system, it’s time for our first charity auctions of 2017! And, well, just look at the extraordinary, once-in-a-lifetime bottles we have available.
 

Charity Auction Timeline

All times in BST (GMT+1), with all the action taking place on the product pages:

Bowmore Black 50 Year Old 1964 – The Last Cask Auction
16:00 Mon 27th March – 14:00 Mon 3rd April

(auction registration opens at 15:00 on 27th March and remains open throughout)
– Over £8k was raised for Malaria No More UK!

The Macallan in Lalique 65 Year Old – Peerless Spirit Auction
16:00 Mon 3rd April – 14:00 Mon 10th April

(auction registration opens at 15:00 on 3rd April and remains open throughout)
– Over £2k was raised for Malaria No More UK!

Everything raised over RRP (net of any applicable VAT) will be donated to the charity Malaria No More UK and will support their inspiring work to help protect literally millions of children and their families against a preventable and treatable disease.*

As we only have one bottle of each, there will not be any bottles available for lottery (with our usual message added to the back label) nor 3cl drams. If you’re not familiar with our charity auctions or lotteries then we encourage you to head over to this post for much more on our reasoning behind doing any of this.
 

About these historic single malt whiskies

Firstly, the last rediscovered cask of legendary 1964 Black Bowmore, and then the final release in The Macallan‘s Six Pillars Collection in Lalique decanters. These are two of the most sought-after whiskies in the world and were aged for at least 50 years and 65 years respectively, making them some of the oldest too.

Distilled on 5th November 1964, the Bowmore Black spent over five decades maturing in the Islay distillery’s celebrated No.1 vaults. Initially filled into two first-fill Oloroso Sherry hogsheads (casks 3708 & 3714), they were later married together within just the one and returned to a cool and quiet corner of the famous warehouse on the shore. Incredibly, this historic cask was somehow forgotten about before being rediscovered recently to understandable excitement and clamour!

Bowmore Black 1964 Last Cask

Bowmore Black 50 Year Old 1964 – The Last Cask – 41.0% abv

 
Producer’s Tasting Note for Bowmore Black 50 Year Old 1964

Nose: The senses are awakened to the deep aromas of soft, sweet, exotic fruits, complemented perfectly by Bowmore’s renowned gentle peat smoke.

Palate: After 50 years maturing in Bowmore’s legendary No.1 Vaults, Black Bowmore 50 Year Old, The Last Cask To Be Rediscovered has developed a sublime elegance on the palate to reveal notes of tropical fruit including mango, papaya and pineapple as well as honeyed black truffle.

Finish: A long, lingering mouth-feel carried by notes of Bowmore’s native Islay seabreeze.
 

“One of the world’s most coveted liquids…”

Just as Bowmore’s legendary Black series has excited enthusiasts and collectors of old and rare whiskies for years (the first four being released between 1993 and 2007), so too have The Macallan in Laliques. The Six Pillars Collection began in 2005 and has seen astonishing 50, 55, 57, 60 and 62 year old releases before this truly extraordinary 65 year old. Appropriately, Lalique have pulled out all the stops with their bespoke crystal decanter. René Lalique’s blown-and-pinched technique has been used to produce a stunning vessel inspired by the finest perfume bottles of the 20th century.

Macallan Lalique Peerless Spirit 65 Year Old

The Macallan in Lalique Peerless Spirit 65 Year Old – The Six Pillars Collection – 46.3% abv

 
Producer’s Tasting Note for The Macallan in Lalique 65 Year Old:
Supremely balanced with comforting notes of honey-dipped Madagascan vanilla pods, cinnamon and Moroccan dates. Medium body with hints of cracked black pepper, cloves and delicately toasted cocoa beans. The finish is very long and deeply satisfying with a rich flavor of honey and dark chocolate.
 
 

“It represents a lifetime of whiskymaking…”

Best of luck in the auction everybody and remember: the higher you bid, the more money will go to Malaria No More UK and their tireless work fighting this deadly yet preventable disease.

 
The Chaps at Master of Malt
 
 
* For more about why we’ve chosen this charity take a look at this post on 1897 Quinine Gin, plus the results of not just the important work they do with education, nets and treatment, but also by leveraging government policy in this article.
 

Categories : News, Scotch Whisky, Whisky

3 comments on “Macallan Lalique & Bowmore Black Charity Auctions: Own Whisky History!”

  1. Stuart says:

    Auctions are discriminatory – favouring the few with lots of money. Raffles are egalitarian giving participants the opportunity of taking part on a more equal basis. To overcome any claims of inequality of opportunity you limit the number of raffle tickets per person. Such a company as yours should strive to treat all its customers fairly. Very disappointing!

    1. Emma Golds says:

      Thanks so much for your message and feedback. I assure you that we are always thinking of the best way to handle limited releases such as these and, as I’m sure you have seen, we often run raffles AND auctions for bottles where we have more than 1 bottle available. Sadly, such limited releases as these require that we make a call as to how to offer these to our customers and on this occasion we thought that we would do something nice for charity at the same time 🙂

      1. Tom says:

        Emma, two other points you could make are: 1) as it is for charity you want to raise the most, and raffles have a flaky history of sometimes underperforming, and 2) I am not sure raffles would not be called discriminatory as those with more money can buy more tickets, thus in the long term, like the coin toss, the results of raffles on average would approach the expected result (those who buy more tickets win the raffles in direct proportion to their investment).

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