We're just loading our login box for you, hang on!

Master of Malt Blog

Tag: St George Spirits

St George Spirits: The home of dynamic distilling

California’s St George Spirits knows no bounds when it comes to distilling invention. We travel to Alameda to meet the team. Across the Bay from the contrasts of San Francisco…

California’s St George Spirits knows no bounds when it comes to distilling invention. We travel to Alameda to meet the team.

Across the Bay from the contrasts of San Francisco – the confines of the street grids and the expanse of sky, the nostalgia and the novelty, the big business and the homelessness – is a startling stretch of nothing. After the colour, the noise, the sharp undulations of the city, arriving the St George Spirits Distillery in Alameda is disorienting.

Driving down West Midway and onto Monarch Street, you feel like you’ve landed on a different planet. The scale is extraordinary; cavernous buildings set back from the road, each in acres of space, barely another car to be seen. The proportions, the flatness, the emptiness are the opposite of the city across the water. I was half an hour ahead of schedule when my Lyft pulled up outside St George, one of the last buildings on the island. I’d enormously overestimated the time it would take to drive over from the city, and was feeling as worried about my early arrival as I was surprised by Alameda’s quiet. It all felt mildly post-apocalyptic.

St George Spirits

Storm incoming: the view from St George back to San Francisco on a grey day. We promise the city is there somewhere

The weather didn’t help. A winter storm was about to roll in; sensible types were already safely harboured from the forecast deluge. My driver had inadvertently, or perhaps intentionally, dropped me on the wrong side, keen to get back over the bridges into the city before the worst of the weather. The St George building was as huge as all the others, and I wondered if anyone would hear my knock. They did. A warm, friendly welcome greeted me, completely at odds to the starkness outside; one of the distilling team led me through the impressive 65,000 sq ft production and warehouse space. There were two banks of gleaming stills, vats and tanks galore, and near-floor to ceiling racking – more on all that shortly. It somehow felt far smaller on the inside that it did from the outside, stack after stack of maturing spirits filling the vast space to the brim. Out the other side, right by the really rather obvious entrance I should have arrived at, was a generous visitor area, with two bars and a shop at the far end. Windows down the exterior wall provided a glorious view back to San Francisco, with all its towers. There’s nothing between the distillery and the city except for a wash of wetland, the Bay itself, and an expanse of concrete which turned out to be a disused runway.

St George Spirits roof

St George barrels and the original WWII hangar roof

“This is World War II construction, an old aircraft hangar,” confirmed Dave Smith, St George Spirits head distiller and vice president, an animated yet softly-spoken fellow who joined the team nearly 14 years ago. He seemed genuinely pleased to see me despite my poor timekeeping, and welcomed me with literal open arms. “The last squadron stationed in the hangar prior to the base’s retirement was Atkron 304, known as the Firebirds, which were made up of Grumman A-6 Intruders.” The scale of the buildings now makes sense, and when I looked into the site afterwards it turns out it was a Naval air base that only closed in 1997.

‘Creating a movement’

St George Spirits dates back to well before the airfield closed, though in a different location. Jörg Rupf, widely considered to be the father of American artisan distilling, set up St George way back in 1982 – long before hipster beards and ubiquitous quirkiness overran the territory marked ‘craft’. He travelled to the US on an assignment from the Ministry of Culture in his native Germany, but it was San Francisco, and his family heritage as Black Forest brandy makers, that shaped his course. It started with eaux-de-vie, pear in particular, made in a tiny “20ft by 20ft” room, Smith told me. Times might have changed when it comes to production scale (the team moved to the current site in 2004) but fruit brandy remains an integral part of the St George offering today.

St George Spirits

St George Pear Brandy in front of the distillery – a starting point for the brand

The breadth of the distillery’s product portfolio is one indicator as to why a visit to St George Spirits is high on the bucket list for so many drinks lovers, myself included. And that’s where we began, hunkered down at one of the gleaming bars as the storm swept in across the Bay. As he poured St George Pear Brandy, Smith was keen to stress just how much of a catalyst Rupf was for the US spirits scene. “Jörg was really thoughtful about helping other distillers,” he said. “He really had a sense of ‘all ships will rise’; he created a movement.” Under his mentorship, other distillers set up shop, and he shared his expertise in fermentation and distilling, especially with regards to eaux-de-vies and fruit spirits – drinks totally new to the market, at the time. It’s a category that makes perfect sense for California, with its lush fruit harvests.

And that’s what you get with Pear Brandy – a hit of fresh lushness. It’s made with Bartlett pears, and a lot of them: there are 30-35lb of pears in each bottle. Why Bartlett pears? “We want small fruit, so the essential oils are very concentrated,” Smith said. The cinnamon spice, pear drop notes develop during a two-week fermentation, with the spirit eventually made in a 250-litre pot still. “Our job as distillers is to be expressive of the raw materials,” Smith stated. It’s this pear spirit that is the base for so many other St George products, including the All Purpose Vodka. That vibrant pear note is like a signature sillage you pick up throughout the portfolio.

St George Spirits

All kinds of distilling options at St George

We tasted our way through the vodka line with California Citrus and Green Chile Vodka. It’s here that the St George philosophy to showcase raw materials really hits home. The spirit is made with five different chilies (jalapeños, serranos, and habaneros, then red and yellow bell peppers) in a mix of infusions and distillations, depending on what flavours, textures and heat levels each technique extracts. “We separate these things out, and then recombine,” he explained. “I can use alcohol as a solvent, I can distil, I can infuse… But I don’t want things to be complex for the sake of being complex.” The creativity, the technicalities, the detail… it’s mind-boggling. And this is just for one bottling among 20 or so – not including limited-run expressions.

Transparent production

We moved on from the vodkas to the trio of St George gins, each distinct, each characterful, but each clearly St George. We start with Dry Rye, which, as the name implies, uses 100% pot-distilled rye spirit as a base. It’s juniper-forward, with just five other botanicals: black peppercorn, caraway, coriander, grapefruit peel and lime peel, combining for a rich, warming hit, but never overpowering the rye character. “We’re trying to find things that are expressive, and that have a statement to make,” Smith said. Next is Botanivore, Smith’s “botanical leader” made with a whopping 19 botanicals with a mix of infusions, macerations and distillations. It’s deliciously complex on the palate, still with that vital juniper but with a St George eccentricity, too.

St George Spirits gin

The trio of St George gins

Next up: Terroir Gin, which was actually the first St George gin, Smith explained. It was master distiller and president Lance Winters who came up with the concept. “He was picking up his son from summer camp, when he had the idea,” he detailed. When you taste the gin, you can picture the scene: the mountains, the forests, the sea. It’s California in a bottle, an evocative, aromatic gin made with Douglas fir, California bay laurel, coastal sage and other local botanicals. The flavour is earthy, outdoorsy, and especially effective with a building storm as a backdrop.

Time to segue into whiskey. First stop: the latest batch of Breaking & Entering, an intriguing expression that blends sourced bourbon and rye with some of St George’s own California malt whiskey. “We want to be really transparent that we’re not making it all in-house,” Smith stated. “And as none of the four grains are more than 51%, there really isn’t a category that we can label it as.” The rye, barley, corn and wheat mashbill is balanced so that none is prominent, but all is delicious. The 2018 edition was bursting with rich, pastry notes, jammy red fruits and dash of menthol, all wrapped up in a sweetcorn smoothness. A treat, indeed.

Just one of the very many barrel types

The final thing we tasted before stepping back into the distillery was St George Single Malt, a fascinating expression that Smith described as a “brandy made from grain”. Winters’ background is brewing; combine that with the eaux-de-vie obsession that underpins operations, and this starts to make sense. The barley at the base of this bottling is malted in multiple ways, including smoking some over beech and alder wood. Different barrels, from ex-Kentucky bourbon and Tennessee, to Port pipes and both French and local wine casks, contribute all kinds of flavours. Maturation spans from four to 19 years. You’d expect it to be bonkers, but it works. It’s batch-produced and changes each year, but the 2018 expression was like a sweetly-spiced hot chocolate, with zesty orange top notes. Lovely stuff. And that’s just part of the portfolio; after the distillery tour we sampled the Raspberry Brandy, Aqua Perfecta Basil Eau de Vie, California Reserve Agricole Rum, Raspberry Liqueur, Spiced Pear Liqueur, NOLA Coffee Liqueur, Bruto Americano bitters and Absinthe Verte, complete with a mischievous monkey on the label. I don’t think I’ve ever encountered such a range from a single producer. Tasting the whole lot in one morning was quite an experience.

Influences and inspiration

St George lays claim to a number of American-firsts in that list, including the Absinthe, which Smith described as “the worst kept secret in the Bay Area for about a decade prior to its official release”. Many defy category definitions (can you even make Rhum Agricole in California? The answer is yes, as long as you drop the ‘h’), and walking through the production space it all starts to make sense. The team here has an infatuation with flavour and a mastery of raw materials and process. There are five pot stills ranging in size from 250 litres to 1,500 litres, including hybrids with column options and an old Holstein, plus a coffee roaster dating back to 1952. If they can possibly make it in house, they will.

St George Spirits

Creation station: All kinds of stills

Grain for spirit currently maturing is floor-malted down the road at Admiral Maltings (“if you think about the real-estate in the Bay Area and what you need for maltings…” Smith says, as an aside). New cask requirements are met by Burgundy-style barrels. The California climate does hit the angel’s share – as much as 10% is lost in the first year, with 3-6% evaporating every year after that. We stopped for a taste of something really exciting – some California Shochu, followed by some unusual cask samples. It was a real treat, and there were yet more examples of surprising ideas coming out of this distillery.

Cali shochu, anyone?

In terms of newness, the stakes ramp up even higher in the St George lab. We stepped into the experiential space and the energy from all the ideas was almost tangible. On the left was a library of samples. Single distillates, infusions and more stack from floor to ceiling. There were two test stills, one 10-litre, one 30-litre, and all kinds of tanks, one even styled to look like Star Wars’ R2-D2. There’s stuff on every surface – you couldn’t call it clutter because it all felt purposeful, like the next big idea could be in any of those little bottles.

St George Spirits

Dave Smith gets the cask sample spirit flowing

“It’s what we’re influenced by, what we’re excited by,” Smith said. “We need to do more than what we did yesterday, increase our repertoire and techniques.” Not everything is successful, he added. But it doesn’t need to be. There’s clearly no fear of failure here, which goes some way to explaining why the range of St George spirits is not just delicious, but incredibly diverse.

St George Spirits lab

Experimental lab stills!

We headed out of the room and back to the bar. The storm was in full swing; rain pounding against the windows, the old WWII wooden roof hollering in the elements. You couldn’t even see across the old runway, let alone make out any shape of the city beyond. Smith looked around back towards the distillery as if taking it all in, and summed up what seems to be the St George philosophy: “We create things because we can.” And what better reason is there than that?

No Comments on St George Spirits: The home of dynamic distilling

Master of Cocktails – The-Candy-Apple-Jack-Hammer

It’s the return of #MasterofCocktails! And there are a few changes to the format… We’re going to be making this a much less step-by-step affair – in return though, you’ll…

Master of Cocktails Candy Apple Jack Hammer

It’s the return of #MasterofCocktails! And there are a few changes to the format… We’re going to be making this a much less step-by-step affair – in return though, you’ll be getting more advanced, exciting cocktail recipes, with more focus on presentation and garnish. We’re also moving to once a fortnight, although still at the usual time of 6pm Sunday on twitter and on the blog the very next day.

No Comments on Master of Cocktails – The-Candy-Apple-Jack-Hammer

Master of Cocktails – First-Press Terroir Sour

Greetings to you all. Time for another #MasterofCocktails? I think so. Last one for a few weeks this, due to impending progeny. Today we’re making a drink that sounds thoroughly…

Master of Cocktails First Press Terroir Sour

Greetings to you all. Time for another #MasterofCocktails? I think so. Last one for a few weeks this, due to impending progeny.

Today we’re making a drink that sounds thoroughly weird, but I assure you is delicious. It’s a gin sour that uses olive oil as an emulsifier.

Now – you can make this drink by shaking, but there is a better way if you’re making at home instead of in a bar. So – we’re going to repair to the kitchen.

1 Comment on Master of Cocktails – First-Press Terroir Sour

Master of Cocktails – The Clover Club Cocktail

Greetings all. Time for some Gin? Gin. Yep. Everyone loves Gin. Lovely Gin. We’re making a classic cocktail for this week’s #MasterofCocktails, which to be honest feels anything but. You’d…

Master of Cocktails The Clover Club Cocktail

Greetings all. Time for some Gin? Gin. Yep. Everyone loves Gin. Lovely Gin.

We’re making a classic cocktail for this week’s #MasterofCocktails, which to be honest feels anything but. You’d swear this was a modern drink. It’s called the Clover Club Cocktail – basically a gin sour with added Raspberry.

Traditionally this would be a syrup, but we’re going to be using the Raspberry Liqueur from St. George Spirits.

No Comments on Master of Cocktails – The Clover Club Cocktail

Master of Cocktails – Bijou Cocktail

Right then Ladies and Gentlemen – it’s time for another #MasterofCocktails. Excited? Oh yes. This week we’re making a Chartreuse-heavy ‘Bijou Cocktail‘ recipe, though we’re making it with slightly less…

Master of Cocktails Bijou Cocktail

Right then Ladies and Gentlemen – it’s time for another #MasterofCocktails. Excited? Oh yes.

This week we’re making a Chartreuse-heavy ‘Bijou Cocktail‘ recipe, though we’re making it with slightly less Green Chartreuse as to not overwhelm the drink.

‘Bijou’ of course, is French for ‘Jewel’, and the cocktail’s name comes from the colours of precious jewels (emerald, diamond and ruby) being similar to the colour of the ingredients (Chartreuse, Gin and Vermouth).

No Comments on Master of Cocktails – Bijou Cocktail

Winnings from the WWA, WDA & Icons of Whisky

Yesterday saw the winners of the 2015 World Drinks Awards announced, as well as the winners of Whisky Magazine’s Icons of Whisky and World Whiskies Awards – a very busy…

World Drinks Awards World Whiskies Awards 2015

Yesterday saw the winners of the 2015 World Drinks Awards announced, as well as the winners of Whisky Magazine’s Icons of Whisky and World Whiskies Awards – a very busy rotation of the Earth! It was also a fantastic day for many of the brands we work with / own / represent as you’ll see from the veritable cornucopia of trophies and awards below.

Drink by the Dram have also produced a selection of Winners Tasting Sets, which you can find here.

No Comments on Winnings from the WWA, WDA & Icons of Whisky

Master of Cocktails – De La Louisiane

Well hello there cocktail fans. Hope you all had a wonderful Burns Night (apostrophe?)! In celebration, for #MasterofCocktails on Sunday we made a De La Louisiane recipe, which is a……

Master of Cocktails The De La Louisiane

Well hello there cocktail fans. Hope you all had a wonderful Burns Night (apostrophe?)! In celebration, for #MasterofCocktails on Sunday we made a De La Louisiane recipe, which is a… erm… a cocktail with American Whiskey.

Should’ve thought that one through a bit better really, eh?

Nevertheless – this really is a good ‘un. It’s sort of a halfway house between a Manhattan and a Vieux Carre.

1 Comment on Master of Cocktails – De La Louisiane

Master of Cocktails – Spiced Pear Whiskey Sour

Right then ladies and gents. Trust everyone’s recovered sufficiently after NYE? Time for this week’s #MasterofCocktails. This week we’re making a super-delicious Whiskey-Sour Variant recipe, which I have simply dubbed…

Master of Cocktails Spiced Pear Whiskey Sour

Right then ladies and gents. Trust everyone’s recovered sufficiently after NYE? Time for this week’s #MasterofCocktails. This week we’re making a super-delicious Whiskey-Sour Variant recipe, which I have simply dubbed the Spiced Pear Whiskey Sour. We’ll be using the St. George Spiced Pear Liqueur for this one. It really is god’s own stuff, made using Pear Brandy, Pear Juice, and spices. Top, top marks St George Spirits.

I’m pairing (pearing? Sorry. Sorry) it with Woodford Reserve Kentucky Bourbon for its perfume. I think this works well with the spice.

2 Comments on Master of Cocktails – Spiced Pear Whiskey Sour

Master of Cocktails – Pedro Grant goes to New Orleans

Right then folks. Time for another #MasterofCocktails! This week’s involves setting things on fire, which is always fun. We’re going to be making a Christmassy twist on a Sazerac recipe…

Master of Cocktails Pedro Grant Goes To New Orleans

Right then folks. Time for another #MasterofCocktails! This week’s involves setting things on fire, which is always fun.

We’re going to be making a Christmassy twist on a Sazerac recipe using Balvenie 15yo Single Barrel and PX Sherry. If anyone feels like complaining about the fact that we’re using a good single malt in a cocktail, can I suggest you jog on and complain to the Daily Mail – they’ll probably have a story to print about it being responsible for immigration. Or something.

No Comments on Master of Cocktails – Pedro Grant goes to New Orleans

Master of Cocktails – Maid in Cuba

Right then Ladies and Gents – time for this week’s #MasterofCocktails. We’re going to be making a drink I first tried a year or so ago at the Savoy, and…

Master of Cocktails Made in Cuba

Right then Ladies and Gents – time for this week’s #MasterofCocktails. We’re going to be making a drink I first tried a year or so ago at the Savoy, and is a drink created by the one and only @tomwalker86 for a Bacardi bartending competition, so it of course prominently features the classic rum at its core – yes, we’re making a ‘Maid In Cuba’ recipe this week.

We were supposed to make it last week, so thanks for waiting patiently. Definitely well worth the wait, though. It’s a good ‘un.

No Comments on Master of Cocktails – Maid in Cuba

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search