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Master of Malt Blog

Tag: Manhattan Cocktail

New Arrival of the Week: Myatt’s Fields Baby Otis

The husband and wife duo behind Myatt’s Fields are taking the fuss out of drinks at home with batched cocktails like the Baby Otis, a rum Manhattan that’s spent time in…

The husband and wife duo behind Myatt’s Fields are taking the fuss out of drinks at home with batched cocktails like the Baby Otis, a rum Manhattan that’s spent time in cask to gain extra deliciousness. 

Do you remember drinks parties? For those who don’t, here’s a little reminder. In the before times, you would invite people over to your house, give them drinks and some snacks, put on some old records, maybe indulge in some dancing or sneak outside onto the balcony for a cigarette even though you gave up years ago. All great fun, except if you were making cocktails. Inevitably, the quality of what you were drinking would deteriorate as the evening progressed. This is where pre-batched cocktails come into their own. All you need to do is make sure you have enough ice, and you can concentrate on the things that matter, like dancing like a robot to Homework by Daft Punk.

Myatt’s Fields Cocktails is husband and wife business consisting of Clemency and Cyrus Gilbert-Rolfe

The dynamic duo, Clemency Penn and Cyrus Gilbert-Rolfe

Batched cocktails are having a moment

Pre-bottled cocktails aren’t just brilliant for parties, they’re good for picnics, festivals and train journeys, and yet despite none of these things happening at the moment sales are booming. The magnificently-named Cyrus Gilbert-Rolfe from Myatt’s Fields Cocktails said that business is up 1000% since last year. He made the comparison with ready meals. Once they were of airline food standard but now there’s a lot of companies producing excellent quality ones. The same with cocktails. Rather than buy lots of ingredients that you might screw up anyway, get the experts in. It’s like having your very own bartender making a perfect cocktail every time.

Myatt’s Fields Cocktails is a husband and wife business consisting of Cyrus Gilbert-Rolfe and Clemency Penn. The idea came from them wanting cocktails at their wedding but didn’t want people to queue while each drink was made to order. They tried lots of premade cocktails but, as Gilbert-Rolfe put it, most tasted like “a dumping ground for bad ingredients.” So they started making their own. After experimenting for a year, trying out recipes on their friends, “which made us very popular” Cyrus said, they unleashed their concoctions on the wedding guests. These were such a hit that “we got more comments about the cocktails than my wife’s dress,” he joked. 

They decided to turn it into a business. Both had digital marketing backgrounds: “We knew a lot about e-commerce but not much about health and safety,” he said. Nevertheless, the business thrived. It is named after a nearby park in Camberwell, South London, Myatt’s Fields. According to Gilbert-Rolfe, the cafe in the middle of the park was their first customer. Now they are stocked by Fortnum & Mason, Fenwicks and, of course, Master of Malt.

Myatt's Fields Vesper Martini

Myatt’s Fields Vesper Martini

Cocktails with a difference

Their cocktails aren’t just delicious but they offer an experience that would be hard to replicate at home. The Vesper Martini for example uses vodka infused with quinine to mimic the taste of Kina Lillet, an aperitif that disappeared in 1986. They make a Limoncello with less sugar and more lemon that’s a world away from the washing up liquid taste you get in your average Italian restaurant. And the Espresso Martini uses Monmouth coffee and was created with the blessing of the late Dick Bradsell‘s partner, Eline Bosman. Bradsell invented the Espresso Martini, along with the Bramble and many other modern classics.

But their big thing is ageing. The pair were inspired by work done by Jeffrey Morgenthaler in the US and Tony Conigliaro in Britain on the effect of controlled oxidation on cocktails. Cyrus explained how they do it: “We make a drink and put it in a cask for two months. It really evolves, it’s more of a journey than fresh cocktails.”

Today’s New Arrival, the Baby Otis, has had just such treatment. Cyrus said “it has a huge base of people who love it.” It’s basically a Manhattan made with Cuban rum, two types of vermouth and grapefruit bitters. This is then aged for around six weeks to meld all those flavours together and bottled at 24.5% ABV. So if you wanted to make this drink at home, you’d have to start six weeks in advance; who is going to be that organised? With Myatt’s Fields Cocktails, Cyrus said: “it’s like having a pro in the house doing it for you.” It’s hard to argue with that. 

Tasting Note by The Chaps at Master of Malt

Touches of cedar wood, brown sugar, and banana, balanced by rich red berries, orange pith, and bittersweet grapefruit.

Myatt’s Fields Cocktails Baby Otis is available from Master of Malt.

Myatts Fields Baby Otis

Myatt’s Fields, SE5 and proud of it

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Easy cocktails to make at home

From the Negroni to the Old Fashioned, here are five easy cocktails to make at home without any equipment more elaborate than a shaker and a jigger. Once you’ve mastered the…

From the Negroni to the Old Fashioned, here are five easy cocktails to make at home without any equipment more elaborate than a shaker and a jigger. Once you’ve mastered the basics, we’ve included tips for how you can upgrade your drink.

Since the strange events of the past year, we’ve become quite proficient home bartenders here at Master of Malt, able to whip up a fairly passable Martini in no time at all. It might not look quite as fancy as one at the Savoy but it certainly hits the spot. That’s the great thing about the classic cocktails, you don’t need a lot of elaborate equipment to make them. In fact, just turn to our home bar essentials page for a good list of bottles you can make pretty much everything with. A proper shaker is worth having and a jigger, and then you’re ready to go. Cocktail nirvana awaits.

Dry Martini with olive easy cocktails to make at home

How to make a Dry Martini:

The king of cocktails! Probably more has been written about the Dry Martini than any other cocktail. The big question is: how strong do you like yours? Some people just like a splash of vermouth, but we like it a little wetter. It’s really up to you. However you like it, use top-quality gin, plenty of ice and whatever you do, don’t shake it!

Basic recipe:

60ml Bathtub Gin
10ml Dolin dry vermouth

First, chill your Martini glass, then fill a shaker with ice and add the ingredients and stir for 30 seconds. Pour into the glass and garnish with an olive. 

Top tip: Keep your gin in the freezer and vermouth in the fridge and your Martini will come out extra cold with less dilution.

The upgrade: Use new make spirit or unaged Armagnac instead of gin for a spicy alternative. 

Old Fashioned - easy cocktails to make at home

How to make an Old Fashioned:

The original cocktail. In the olden timey days a cocktail simply meant a mixture of spirit with water, sugar, ice and bitters. Rye whiskey or bourbon are the most common spirits used but the Old Fashioned can be made with pretty much anything under the sun such as rum, single malt Scotch whisky, mezcal, Tequila, or gin. 

Basic recipe:

60ml Black & Gold 11 Year Old Bourbon
1 tablespoon sugar syrup
Angostura Bitters to taste

Fill a tumbler with ice, add all the ingredients and stir thoroughly for 30 seconds. Taste, add more bitters of sugar syrup if you want. Express a piece of orange peel over the top, drop it in and serve.

Top tip: Don’t bother mucking about with sugar cubes like Don Draper in Mad Men, just use a simple syrup.

Upgrade: Use sweet sherry-like a cream or PX instead of sugar syrup. This works particularly well if you’re using a sherry cask whisky.

Negroni easy cocktails to make at home

How to make a Negroni:

Probably the easiest of easy cocktails, the bitter complex Negroni was once a trade secret, beloved by bartenders but thought a little too much for your average customer. Well, not any more, the Negroni is very much mainstream. Part of the appeal is it’s so easy to make. Just make sure you’ve got plenty of good cold ice and you’re ready to go.

Basic recipe:

30ml Campari
30ml Martini Rosso
30ml Beefeater London Dry Gin

Add all the ingredients to an ice-filled tumbler. Still well, express a piece of orange peel and drop it in.

Top tip: A trad juniper-forward London Dry works best. We’ve had some Negroni disasters with liquorice-heavy and other unusual gins.

Upgrade: Everything is up for grabs with a Negroni. Try swapping the gin for mezcal, play around with different vermouths or even use something else like Amaro Montenegro instead of Campari.

Daiquiri Naturale easy cocktails to make at home

How to make a Daiquiri:

Nowadays when you order a Daiquiri in Havana, you tend to get the frozen version. What we have here is what’s known in Cuba as a Daiquiri Naturale. There are so many different ratios out there, this one comes from Simon Difford and it works beautifully.

Basic recipe:

50ml Havana Club Añejo 3 Year Old
15ml lime juice
10ml sugar syrup

Shake ingredients with plenty of ice and double strain into a chilled Martini glass. Serve with a wedge of lime

Top tip: Be carefully when squeezing the limes that you don’t get any oils from the skin in as this can make your Daiquiri bitter.

Upgrade: Use dark rum and a little coffee liqueur to make a rich Daiquiri Mulata, a great after-dinner sipper. 

Manhattan cocktail with orange peel, easy cocktails to make at home

How to make a Manhattan:

A good way to think of a Manhattan is that it’s a sweet Martini made with dark spirits instead of gin. Rye is traditional but there’s a whole family of similar drinks such as the Rob Roy, made with Scotch, the Emerald, with Irish whiskey, and the Harvard, using Cognac. 

Basic recipe:

50ml Michter’s US*1 Rye
25ml Cinzano Rosso 1757
Dash of Angostura bitters

Stir ingredients with lots of ice in a shaker and strain into a cold coupe or a Nick & Nora. Express a piece of orange zest over and drop into the glass. 

Top tip: Though the Manhattan is traditionally served straight up, it’s also excellent on the rocks for when you want your easy cocktail fix quick.

Upgrade: Add a tablespoon of Fernet Branca to your Manhattan to give it a powerful menthol breeze. It’s like cough medicine for grown-ups. 

 

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Cocktail of the Week: The Harvard

This week we’re making a drink named after the fanciest college in America, the Sarah Lawrence! Sorry, no, it’s the Harvard. Plus there’s a shameless plug for a new book…

This week we’re making a drink named after the fanciest college in America, the Sarah Lawrence! Sorry, no, it’s the Harvard. Plus there’s a shameless plug for a new book called The Cocktail Dictionary

In January 2019, I started writing, with help from Adam and Annie, a weekly cocktail column for this blog. The first entry was the Brooklyn. Since then I was asked by Mitchell Beazley to do The Cocktail Dictionary, part of a series of booze books like The Whisky Dictionary, The Tequila Dictionary, you get the idea. And now it’s here! It’s an A-Z of drinks with entries on shaking, ice, equipment etc. Not only are the words top quality but it has witty illustrations by George Wyesol. 

Anyway, that’s enough shameless plugging. Let’s talk cocktails. This week we’re making the Harvard, part of a series of old time drinks named after Ivy League universities such as the Princeton, the Yale, and erm, the Brown. It’s rather like a Manhattan but made with Cognac instead of bourbon, and then diluted with a splash of soda. The Harvard may actually predate the Manhattan, however. Many cocktails were originally made with brandy. Cognac was king in the 19th century but its preeminence among spirits was destroyed by phylloxera, the vine-eating louse that wrecked Europe’s vineyards. British drinkers switched to blended Scotch whisky and American cocktail enthusiasts switched to bourbon or rye. So the Harvard is a little taste of what Americans were drinking in the 1880s.

Just one of the excellent illustrations by George Wyesol

As with all cocktails, there are lots of ways to make it. In some recipes, the Harvard is just a Manhattan but made with brandy instead of bourbon or rye, and very nice it is too made like that. According to David Embury in his Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (1948), if you use orange bitters it’s a Harvard but if you use Angostura, it’s a Delmonico try asking for that one in your local bar. Other versions call for sugar syrup, lemon juice and even grenadine (!) which sounds much too sweet. Harry Craddock in The Savoy Cocktail Book (1935) makes his with half brandy and half vermouth with a dash of sugar syrup and two dashes of Angostura. But earlier still, George J. Kappeler Modern American Drinks (1895) was adding a splash of soda which is how we’re going to do it today. It makes it more accessible than a Manhattan and the dilution brings out the fruit in the brandy. You could even, in the summer, up the soda quotient and serve it as a Highball-type thing. But the evenings are getting cold now, so we’re not going to do that.

Traditionally Cognac would have been used but I’m using Janneau VSOP Armagnac which is very fruity and with a wine-like tang. It’s a very superior brandy for the money. Instead of Italian vermouth, I’m using Gonzalez Byass La Copa from Spain. This is made with PX sherry so it’s really quite sweet. Too sweet, I find, to drink on its own but works beautifully in booze-heavy cocktails. You really don’t need any sugar syrup. After a bit of experimentation, I found that adding the soda in two stages kept some fizz without warming up the drink. Finally bitters, the recipe in the book doesn’t call for bitters, but it’s a nice addition. Angostura or orange, it’s up to you.

Are you a Harvard man?

Right, got your ingredients ready? Let’s Harvard! Oh, and here’s a final plug for the book: The Cocktail Dictionary: An A–Z of cocktail recipes, from Daiquiri and Negroni to Martini and Spritz by Henry Jeffreys is published by Mitchell Beazley, £15.99. Totally shameless.

60ml Janneau VSOP Armagnac
30ml Gonzalez-Byass La Copa vermouth
Two dashes of Angostura bitters (optional)
30ml soda water (ideally chilled)

Add the first three ingredients and half the soda, a splash, to an ice-filled cocktail shaker. Stir for 30 seconds until well chilled. Strain into a chilled coupette or Martini glass, add another splash of soda water and garnish with an orange twist.

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20 pro tips to make bar-quality cocktails at home

Curious about how the professionals make cocktails at home? Wonder no longer. From pre-freezing glassware to emulsifying egg drinks, here’s 20 expert-backed tips, tricks and hacks you can adopt to…

Curious about how the professionals make cocktails at home? Wonder no longer. From pre-freezing glassware to emulsifying egg drinks, here’s 20 expert-backed tips, tricks and hacks you can adopt to make bar-standard drinks in your kitchen…

No matter how well-versed you are at knocking up an Old Fashioned or a Daiquiri from the comfort of your own home, nothing quite beats the finesse of a bar-side serve. The question is: why?

Turns out, there’s more to making a cracking cocktail than just combining measured liquids in the correct order. But you don’t need loads of fancy kit and obscure ingredients to achieve them – all you need is a little know-how. We asked bartenders, brand ambassadors, and other knowledgeable drinks industry folks to share their hacks for making the best possible cocktails at home. Here’s what they had to say…

You’ll need ice, lots and lots of ice

Ice

Use more than you think you need

“There is one rule that I always stick to when making cocktails at home: Use good ice, and a lot of it,” says Renaud de Bosredon, Bombay Sapphire UK brand ambassador. “Using just two ice cubes in a Gin & Tonic or to stir a Martini will only add water and won’t cool the drink down properly. Don’t hold back. The more ice, the better!”

Filter before you fill up

“Ice is often overlooked as an ingredient, but in certain cocktails it can add up to 50% of dilution, so you want to be using the best quality ice possible,” says No. 3 Gin brand ambassador Ross Bryant. “Water quality is different all over the country, so anyone making ice in a hard water area should filter their water first before freezing.” 

Freeze your own large format ice 

“You can do this by filling a take-away container full of ice and leaving it to freeze, use a serrated knife to then cut it into nice big blocks,” says Dan Garnell, head bartender at Super Lyan, Amsterdam. “This will help keep the drink cold but won’t add too much dilution.” 

Know the difference between ‘wet’ and ‘dry’ ice

“If your ice is ‘wet’ – i.e. wet on every side, it has been out of the freezer for a while – it will dilute your drink quicker,” says Bryant, “whereas ice cubes taken straight from the freezer are ‘dry’ and will dilute your drink slightly slower.”

Manhattan Duke

Manhattan: 2 parts rye, 1 part vermouth, dash of bitters

Methodology

Resize drinks via ‘parts’

“Try transforming measurements in parts instead of ml or ounces,” says Andrei Talapanescu, head bartender at Pulitzer’s Bar in Amsterdam. “For example, a Manhattan will work with 2 parts base spirit, 1 part modifier and a couple dashes of bitters. Instead of 50ml/25ml or 60ml/30ml, there’s less to remember, and it’s easier to adjust according to the available glassware.” 

Introduce new flavours slowly

“You can always add more, but you can’t remove,” says Osvaldo Romito, bartender at the Megaro Hotel in London. “If you’re not sure, just start with a little bit and add more as you go.”

Look to physical cues

“Shake or stir until the temperature has reached an equilibrium,” says Talapanescu, “until you see condensation on the stirring glass or frost on the stainless steel shaker.”

Dry shake egg-based drinks

“When making drinks that contain egg, you must first ‘emulsify’ the egg,” says Bryant. “To do this, you must first shake all your ingredients without ice. Once shaken, open your shaker and add ice in order to chill and dilute your drink.”

Ask yourself, is that garnish really essential?

Garnish

Identify the essentials

“Garnishes can be divided into two: aromatic enhancers and aesthetic enhancers,” says Andrei Talapanescu, head bartender at Pulitzer’s Bar in Amsterdam. “Do not omit the aromatic ones such as citrus zest, mint, or a spray. The rest can be left out.”

Dehydrate wheels of fruit… 

“These are so easy,” says Karol Terejlis, bars manager at Baltic and Ognisko, both in London.  “Put your oven on 70 degrees celsius and dry slices of orange, mandarins, tangerines, lemons and limes for around 8 to 10 hours. I also dry out strawberries and raspberries for the same time, then blend them to make a powder. Good for garnishes with a strong colour!”

…Or alternatively, freeze them

“Pre-freeze fruit slices,” suggests Metinee Kongsrivilai, Bacardi rum UK brand ambassador. “This will help reduce food waste as it preserves the fruit, but it’s also great for chilling your drinks and it adds to the drink’s presentation. This would be most effective with perfectly diluted drinks.”

Utilise kitchen kit

“Potato peelers will cut you great citrus peel twists,” says David Eden-Sangwell, brand ambassador at Old J Rum. “The Y-shaped peelers are the best for this and will leave most of the bitter pith behind.”

Terri Brotherston in action

Prep

Chill the glass

“Making drinks without ice?,” says Eden-Sangwell. “Chill the glass with ice and water while you mix the drink and empty just before pouring the drink in. This will keep your drink cold for longer.” Alternatively, pop your glass in the freezer for a couple of minutes.

Pre-batch your ingredients

“If you are making multiple drinks, prepare in advance,” says Terri Brotherston, whisky specialist at Edrington-Beam Suntory UK. “You can make a small batch of sugar syrup in advance and store it in the fridge. You can juice two or three lemons or limes beforehand and keep it in a jug. It means your ingredients are already to hand and will make it a much smoother, more enjoyable process.”

Keep bottles in the freezer

“If you’re more of a stirred-down, spirit-forward – dry vodka Martini, for example – kind of person, whack that pre-diluted spirit in the freezer,” says Nicole Sykes, bartender at Satan’s Whiskers in London and Bacardi Legacy Cocktail Competition 2020 UK Winner. “That way you’ll get consistently ice cold Martinis with a great texture, straight from the bottle and you don’t have to panic if you don’t have any ice. Pour straight into a pre-frozen glass.”

Blend your cocktail

“Utilise that blender,” says Sykes. “For really quick, consistent and cold drinks, stick your favourite cocktails into a blender, add 10ml more sugar syrup – which you can also make in your blender using equal parts caster sugar and water by weight – and blend with supermarket ice to make a slush!”

Pre-batch your cocktails

“I’ve got bottles of pre-batched drinks ready to go,” says Bartender Paul Mathew, owner of Bermondsey bar The Hide and founder of Everleaf, “including a Negroni, a Last Word (just add lime and shake), and a Diplomat (my wife’s favourite) – plus plenty of Everleaf for non-drinking evenings and aperitifs.”

The Nightcap

Sometimes, the best tip is just to keep it simple

Creativity 

Create your own cordials

“Experiment with home cordials,” suggests Garnell. “For instance, after doing fresh orange juice in the morning, boil the husks in a mixture of water, orange juice and spices such as clove, cinnamon or nutmeg. Leave it to simmer for 10 to 15 minutes and strain – you have your own spiced orange cordial!”

Try a milk wash

“Add one part spirit to a bowl and one quarter of its volume in lemon juice,” says Adam Rog, senior bartender at The Four Sisters bar in Islington. “Pour your spirit and lemon mixture into milk and watch it curdle. Once split, usually after 10 minutes, run it through a filter – try a microfibre cloth or some kitchen towel, as you’ll want it to catch the curds but keep the lactose. After this, you can add whatever flavours you think best. We milk wash coffee liqueur and add vodka, sugar, vanilla essence and cacao to create a smoother take on a White Russian.”

Or, just keep it simple

“One of my favourite cocktails to make at home is a Negroni,” says Ben Flux, bartender at Merchant House in London. “It’s simple, but a bartender’s favourite! Add a sustainable twist with Discarded Cascara Vermouth and spent coffee grounds to create a cold brew Negroni.”

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Cocktail of the Week: The Manhattan

Today’s we’re looking at a cocktail named after the most famous island in the world. It could only be…  the Isle of Man! Oh no, hang on, it’s the Manhattan….

Today’s we’re looking at a cocktail named after the most famous island in the world. It could only be…  the Isle of Man! Oh no, hang on, it’s the Manhattan.

Whenever I’m making a Manhattan, which is often, I find myself involuntarily singing ‘Shattered’ by the Rolling Stones. It’s the closing track on their 1978 album Some Girls. On this record, perhaps their sleaziest and an ode to the highs and lows of New York City, the Stones not only embrace disco with the song ‘Miss You’ but on ‘Shattered’ Mick sort of raps and, surprisingly, it’s totally brilliant. It’s the lines, “my brain’s been battered/ splattered all over Manhattan”, I sing to myself as I cheerfully mix my drink.

From the ultimate song about New York (don’t @ me), to the ultimate Gotham cocktail. As the Martini is to gin, so the Manhattan is to whiskey, spirit flavoured with vermouth. But as Americans were drinking whiskey before gin, you could argue that the Martini is simply a gin Manhattan.

Manhattan

Go ahead, bite the big apple

The Manhattan has it origins in the mid-19th century when vermouth became all the rage. In fact, it was drinks like the Manhattan that made the original cocktail, the Old Fashioned, seem, well a bit, old fashioned (see article on the origins of the Old Fashioned.) So you could call a Manhattan a New Fashioned, though probably don’t try this next time you’re in New York or people will think you’re a bit of a dick.

The original Manhattan would have been made with rye whiskey rather than bourbon. Once rye was hard to get hold of, especially in Britain, but in recent years it has undergone something of a renaissance and we are now spoiled for choice. I’m using Michter’s because it’s absolutely delicious, totally over delivering on spice and depth of flavour for the money. If you’re using bourbon, find one with a high rye content like Four Roses Small Batch.

Like the Martini, the Manhattan has gradually become drier since its invention. Early recipes call for equal parts vermouth to whiskey as well as a sugar syrup. You can make your Manhattan ‘perfect’ by using half French and half Italian vermouth. Or ‘dry’ by using just French. To make a smoky Manhattan try rinsing the glass with a drop or two of Islay whisky before adding the bourbon and vermouth (if you go all the way and substitute the American whiskey for Scotch, then your Manhattan becomes a Rob Roy).

Manhattan cocktail

You can put an enormous ice cube your Manhattan if you’re in the mood

The next big question is whether to shake or stir. I am firmly in the stirring camp but, unlike in a Martini, I think a little dilution isn’t such a bad thing here so you don’t need to use cold whiskey or vermouth. Oh, and a Maraschino cherry is a nice touch if you have them.

Right, got your ingredients ready? Some Girls cued up? Then take it away Mick, “go ahead, bite the big apple, don’t mind the maggots.”

50ml Michter’s US*1 Rye
25ml Cinzano Rosso 1757
Dash of Angostura bitters

Stir ingredients with lots of ice in a shaker and strain into a cold Martini glass (you can use a coupe or a Nick & Nora instead). Express a piece of orange zest over and drop into the glass. Add a cherry if you’re feeling hungry.

 

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New 50cl Cocktails from The Handmade Cocktail Company!

The Handmade Cocktail Company‘s range of Pre-Bottled Cocktails has had a bit of a shake-up! From today, the entire 2015 selection will be available in 50cl bottles alongside the award-winning…

50cl Handmade Cocktail Company 2015

The Handmade Cocktail Company‘s range of Pre-Bottled Cocktails has had a bit of a shake-up! From today, the entire 2015 selection will be available in 50cl bottles alongside the award-winning 70cl editions that were first launched over four years ago.

As well as updated recipes, there’s also a brand new addition for 2015 – another graduate from the Experimental Series: The Boulevardier! Do you enjoy a delicious Negroni? How about a classic Manhattan? Well if you answered yes to either or both of those questions then you’ll love The Boulevardier, made with top quality bourbon with a very high rye content, a blend of sweet vermouths and classic bitter apéritif. That said, if you like a Negroni or Manhattan, they’re available from The Handmade Cocktail Company too!

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Master of Cocktails – The Long-Standing Beef

Right then chaps – time for this week’s #MasterofCocktails. We’re making a sort of Old Fashioned/Manhattan hybrid using Maple Syrup as the sweetening agent. Oh, and candied bacon as a…

Master of Cocktails Long Standing Beef

Right then chaps – time for this week’s #MasterofCocktails. We’re making a sort of Old Fashioned/Manhattan hybrid using Maple Syrup as the sweetening agent. Oh, and candied bacon as a garnish, as if this cocktail recipe wasn’t sounding awesome enough already.

However, before you even think about touching any of the liquids, you’re going to need to candy your bacon. No, that’s not a euphemism.

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Master of Cocktails – The Americano Bolognese

Well hello there you. Time for another #MasterofCocktails me thinks. This week we made a twist on a classic, which is genuinely better than the real thing. We’re making an…

Master of Cocktails Americano Bolognese

Well hello there you. Time for another #MasterofCocktails me thinks. This week we made a twist on a classic, which is genuinely better than the real thing. We’re making an ‘Americano Bolognese’.

I have a real problem with ‘regular’ Americanos. They take one of the best drinks in the world (Camparisoda) and ruin it. This concoction, however, stands entirely on its own two feet, borrowing only the booze-ingredients from the original.

So – a quick thank you to @nuloungebar, and @MaverickDrinks for the recipe, and then straight into it.

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Master of Cocktails – The Manhattan

As mentioned last week, this one is going to be super-simple and super-high-quality. We’re making the perfect Manhattan, something not entered into lightly, of course, as it’s a cocktail that’s…

Master of Cocktails Manhattan cocktail

As mentioned last week, this one is going to be super-simple and super-high-quality. We’re making the perfect Manhattan, something not entered into lightly, of course, as it’s a cocktail that’s no doubt close to many people’s hearts. A true classic that enjoys fame around the globe, this version, none-the-less, is a little bit special.

You could follow the action and mix-along on twitter (#MasterofCocktails) on Sunday night, as you can every week, and now here it is in all its completeness for you to enjoy!

Let’s get to it…

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